Psychological Science & Society: Summer@USC

The official Tumblr for the Psychological Science & Society class at USC Summer Programs. Psychology, neuroscience, current events, social justice, pop culture, and GIFs. Imagine if Buzzfeed and Upworthy had an unabashedly nerdy lovechild. That's this.

Curated by @leslie_bern. Questions? (And you certainly don't have to be in the class.) Ask or tweet me!
More contemporary research on “Freudian slips” suggests that they occur when people have two different concepts or words in their mind at one time, like “great” and “cool,” rather than because of any covertly sexual motivations. 

More contemporary research on “Freudian slips” suggests that they occur when people have two different concepts or words in their mind at one time, like “great” and “cool,” rather than because of any covertly sexual motivations. 

And finally denial. This one is exactly what it sounds like—refusing to accept what everyone else knows to be true. 

And finally denial. This one is exactly what it sounds like—refusing to accept what everyone else knows to be true. 

Projection is when you attribute your own threatening impulses/desires to other people. So, for example, when people go on Maury accusing their partners of cheating, but then end up confessing to cheating themselves. 

Projection is when you attribute your own threatening impulses/desires to other people. So, for example, when people go on Maury accusing their partners of cheating, but then end up confessing to cheating themselves. 

Rationalization: When you offer self-justifying explanations after something doesn’t work out so that you can make yourself feel better. See above. 

Regression: When you revert to behaviors typically associated with an earlier developmental stage.
Side note: I have it on good authority that this works really well to talk your way out of traffic tickets. One of my mentors has used “Oh my dad’s a cop! He’s going to be so mad at me!” every single time and she says it has never failed her once. 

Regression: When you revert to behaviors typically associated with an earlier developmental stage.

Side note: I have it on good authority that this works really well to talk your way out of traffic tickets. One of my mentors has used “Oh my dad’s a cop! He’s going to be so mad at me!” every single time and she says it has never failed her once. 

This one’s called displacement. It’s when you redirect all of your anger to a more “socially appropriate” target, rather than the person that caused your anger. 
We’re not here yet, but it’s also worth noting that cathartically venting your anger actually makes you *angrier* in the long term. More on that later.

This one’s called displacement. It’s when you redirect all of your anger to a more “socially appropriate” target, rather than the person that caused your anger. 

We’re not here yet, but it’s also worth noting that cathartically venting your anger actually makes you *angrier* in the long term. More on that later.

Turns out there’s actually a term for what Helga was doing to Arnold. Freud called it reaction formation and it’s when you deliberately show the world the opposite of what you’re feeling. 
Granted, he thought boys did this to buffer against the anxiety of wanting to kill their fathers and do their moms, but whatever. People do this all the time, but, hopefully, for other reasons. 

Turns out there’s actually a term for what Helga was doing to Arnold. Freud called it reaction formation and it’s when you deliberately show the world the opposite of what you’re feeling. 

Granted, he thought boys did this to buffer against the anxiety of wanting to kill their fathers and do their moms, but whatever. People do this all the time, but, hopefully, for other reasons. 

According to the story, Oedipus gouged his eyes out once he realized that he had, in fact, killed his father and married his mother. Although this isn’t something people do in the Freudian context, it’s worth noting that auto-enucleation (removing one’s eyeballs) is a very real, although very rare, thing. In particular, a new study has looked at this very specific kind of self-mutilation around the world and found that it’s most often due to undiagnosed psychosis (e.g., the belief that your eyeballs are possessed, etc.)

Presented without comment. 

Because that’s not all, Freud also believed that, somewhere between the ages of 3-6, boys developed an Oedipus complex (after the Greek tragedy of the same name). In short, they start to develop romantic feelings for their mother and intense jealousy/hatred towards their father, who they now view as their rival. He also thought that boys developed castration anxiety out of the intense fear that their father would catch onto them and, yes, exactly what it sounds like.

Crazy, right? Here are some puppets.